Online Security Management Degree Program

With the increasing need for security in a changing world, professionals with expertise in all aspects of security management and operational administration will be in demand. Security professionals enable private and public organizations to strengthen existing security measures and initiate policies and procedures to ensure a safe and secure working environment, as well as to prevent or limit organizational losses. The online Security Management degree program is targeted to those pursuing employment opportunities in private or government security. Moreover, these security management courses engage learners in studies and practices directed toward entering into or advancing in the growing security administration and management industry.

With specific security management courses concentrating on managerial techniques and leadership and security theories and practices, this degree offers the knowledge required to enter into this competitive field.

Those completing this Southwestern College Professional Studies program can pursue jobs in security management and related areas, such as physical security, loss prevention, information security, homeland security, emergency management and crime prevention.

Contact an admissions counselor today for more information about this program.

Program Outcomes

With the increasing need for security in a changing world, security professionals with expertise in all aspects of security management and operational administration will be in demand. Security professionals enable private and public organizations to strengthen existing security measures and initiate policies and procedures to ensure a safe and secure working environment, as well as to prevent or limit organizational losses. The Security Management degree is targeted to those pursuing employment opportunities in private or government security. Moreover, this career-relevant degree engages students in studies and practices directed toward entering into, or advancing in the growing security industry.

With specific Security Management courses concentrating on managerial techniques and leadership, security theories and practices, our degree offers the knowledge students require to enter into this competitive field. Security Management program courses include introduction to Security; Physical Security; Homeland Security; Terrorism – Motivations and Adversaries; Emergency Planning; Legal Aspects of Security; Information Security; Loss Prevention and Crime Prevention; and a Senior Capstone portfolio course.

Those completing the Security Management program are prepared for a diverse group of Security Management and related jobs. These include jobs are not only in security management – physical security, loss prevention, and information security, but in the fields of homeland security, emergency management, and crime prevention.

Program Outcomes:

  1. Relate the historical development of security, the security function, the fundamentals of defense, homeland security, critical infrastructure sectors and protection, and the coordination and communication between government agencies and private entities.
  2. Compare and contrast physical security design, risk assessment, the process of physical protection system design and integration as well as explain the framework for analyzing current and projected data and information exposure within an organization.
  3. Examine the security function and issues from a loss prevention and crime prevention perspective and present countermeasures and strategies to prevent organizational losses.
  4. Analyze the legal issues and concepts such as the law of arrest, search and seizure, detention, surveillance, and legal consequences that affect security professionals and organizations.
  5. Illustrate disaster and emergency planning, preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery concepts and practices.
  6. Summarize the histories, motivations, groups, types, and tactics of terrorism involved in international and domestic terrorism.

Required and Core Courses

Foundation Courses

CORE101 Developing Academic and Professional Strengths
CORE110 Information Literacy
ENGL101 Composition I
ENGL102 Composition II
COM 125 Speech
Mathematics Requirement*
HUM 201 Ethics
COM 301 Professional Communication

Disciplinary Perspective Courses

Humanities (6 credits)
Natural Sciences/Mathematics (4 credits)
Social Sciences (6 credits)

Major Courses

SMGT311 Introduction to Security
SMGT315 Physical Security
SMGT320 Information Security
SMGT321 Homeland Security Fundamentals
SMGT411 Loss Prevention & Crime Prevention
SMGT415 Legal Aspects of Security
SMGT420 Emergency Planning
SMGT424 Terrorism – Motivations & Adversaries
CAPS495 Senior Capstone

* MASC110 Statistics & Probability, or MASC115 College Algebra, or more advanced college credit bearing mathematics course requiring college algebra or higher as a prerequisite

Course Descriptions

SMGT311 Introduction to Security

This course includes a detailed review of the representative duties of the professionals engaged in private and public security. It focuses on the latest trends, concerns, and issues in the security industry today. This includes specific threat analysis, countermeasures, the security function, and fundamentals of defense. The course will also provide an overview of the historical development of security.

SMGT315 Physical Security

This course examines physical design, risk assessment, security surveys, barriers, locks, lighting, alarms, entry control, closed circuit television, and digital recording systems. The overall process of physical protection system design and integration is also extensively covered.

SMGT320 Information Security

This course introduces learners to the fundamentals of information security management to prepare them to be able to plan, implement, and maintain information security function within an organization. Learners will examine the technical components of information security and security planning, and legal and ethical issues surrounding information security. They will explore various strategies to identify, assess, and mitigate information security risks within an organization. Learners will also be introduced to security technology, intrusion detection, cryptography, and physical security.

SMGT321 Homeland Security Fundamentals

A diverse group of topics related to homeland security are covered. Topics include, but are not limited to, critical infrastructure sectors and protection, weapons of mass destruction, planning and response strategies, national security, and public management. There is also a review of the essential coordination and communication between government agencies and private entities.

SMGT411 Loss Prevention and Crime Prevention

The course examines the security function and issues from a loss prevention and crime prevention perspective. It specifically shows how to avoid or minimize losses with a wealth of practical information. This includes, but is not limited to, community-oriented policing, workplace violence, internal theft controls, executive protection, awareness, retail security, high-rise security and fire life safety, personal safety and self defense, designing crime risk management systems, financial institution security, telecommunications fraud, and counterespionage strategies.

SMGT415 Legal Aspects of Security

This course provides a thorough overview of the legal issues and concepts that security professionals must be familiar with while operating in public or private organizations. A review of legal rights available to security officers, corporations, partnerships, and individually owned businesses for the protection of their property from theft by employees, customers and others is covered. The law of arrest, search and seizure, detention, surveillance, and legal consequences are also examined.

SMGT420 Emergency Planning

The course provides a practical process of disaster response planning and mitigation for security professionals working in both public and private organizations. A review of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is covered, as well as an examination of the roles, responsibilities, and interrelationship between FEMA, state and local emergency management systems, and other critical partners. The government’s emergency resources available before, during, and after crises are also explained. The fundamental disciplines of emergency management are covered as well.

SMGT424 Terrorism-Motivations and Adversaries

This course reviews the events, ideas, motivations, and histories that result in terrorist acts. In addition, it examines the theories that help explain the volatile behavior surrounding international and domestic terrorism, as well as domestic extremist groups in the United States. There is also a conceptual overview of terrorism which progresses to a focused discussion of the terrorists, investigation of the nuances of the terrorist trade, and concludes with a final analysis of modern terrorism.

CAPS495 Senior Capstone

Learners will be required to develop a professional portfolio that demonstrates their knowledge, skills, and abilities in their major discipline. Particular attention will be given to the presentation of evidence and artifacts from their major courses as well as recent research relevant to their major courses and their specific program outcomes. The purpose of the final portfolio project is to document learner achievement and to ensure learning outcomes are met. Additionally, learners will conduct research and report on career potentials within their major field, careers for which they are potentially most qualified, and a specific career and career path of interest resulting from their research. This project is both submitted individually and as a part of the professional portfolio. Both projects are required for successful course and degree completion. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all major courses.

Admission Requirements

Entering learners must have earned at least 6 college credits from previous college coursework or ACE evaluated military training, a GPA of 2.0, and have three years of work experience. Transfer hours accepted for Professional Studies admittance should include English Composition I and II, and mathematics (college algebra preferred). These courses may be considered in transfer or completed at Southwestern College.

Contact a program representative to evaluate your options.

Graduation Requirements

A total of 124 credit hours must be earned to graduate. You must have at least 60 credit hours from a four-year university or college and at least 30 hours from Southwestern College (does not include prior learning experience credits). Of the 30 hours required from Southwestern, 15 of the last 30 hours earned toward your degree must be at Southwestern College. Contact your Academic Success Coach for more information.

Meta

Southwestern College Professional Studies offers a bachelor of science in security management that touches on a wide range of security issues, including homeland security, anti-terrorism, corporate security, and other venues.